Toying with VS Emulator, Hyper-V + Linux, Apache Cordova, and Windows 10 Virtual Desktops

You know this weekend I took my time to explore a few things in Windows 10 and Visual Studio 2015. For starters, every time I installed Windows, being a Windows Pro version owner I never bothered checking the features it offered, such as BitLocker.

Hyper-V

So, the thing about Hyper-V is that it’s something really, really abstract to the Windows user. Unless you poke the bear you won’t really know what’s in there. Hyper-V is a solution similar to Virtual Box, VMWare, it provides virtualization capabilities to your Windows. Now, why I mention Hyper-V is because it was almost a routine for me to always install Virtual Box after installing Windows, then it occurs to me that we already had Hyper-V to begin with.

I loaded up OpenSUSE Leap ISO and to my surprise everything worked flawlessly.

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You still need to configure the network through the Virtual Switch Manager in Hyper-V else the network won’t work, it only takes a couple of clicks.

Virtual Desktops

I’m a big fan of virtual desktops, every time I winded up using Windows part of me wanted to use virtual desktops because it was a way for me to organize my applications through tasks. Windows 10 finally, after many years, went ahead and added virtual desktops to the mix.

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Apache Cordova

In my internship I worked with Angular JS extensively to the point that I became interested in making mobile applications using HTML/JavaScript. I know of the existence of Cordova, however I’ve never used it mostly due to no interest in it. Curiosity took the best of me, I launched Visual Studio 2015, installed the required components and within an hour I started my little adventure on playing with Cordova.

I have mixed feelings about it. At first sight it feels like the application structure will crumble apart in any moment. It’s not the same having a set of widgets to work with, as in there’s: ListView, WebView, TableView, Layout controls, Buttons, Combo Boxes, and so much more available programmatically through an API. With Cordova you have HTML5/JavaScript and pretty much 9000000 javascript scripts available. Does it mean it’s “stable”? If you stick to jQuery, AngularJS, etc then sure.

Either way, Cordova is new to me and things like debugging, poking around seems too loose at the moment.

Visual Studio Emulator

I have a beef with this emulator… I can’t deploy Qt applications with it as the shader program is not linked. I want to deploy Qt applications because else I would have to disable Hyper-V and I don’t want to do that because it requires me to reboot every time.

Overall my experience with VSE has been nice, it’s straightforward, I just wish it played with Qt nicely. The best part? Qt Creator can automatically detect VS Emulator emulators running so you don’t have to do any extra work.

What’s next in programming?

So basically I’m at my wits end. I haven’t had the time to finish my application. There are two things that have demotivated me greatly. First, the overhead of QML is too much to the point that I might have to drop it. This means I’ll have to come up with a way to build a new interface out of html/js/websockets.

I’m up for the challenge, I really am, yet I feel awful about it because I’m scrapping a large portion of the presentation for something that takes time to do. I don’t think the Qt team can optimize the QML Engine in less than two months. The original schedule was to release at March, yet due to circumstances (doing internship, loss of motivation due to the fact that I have to scrap code) I haven’t sat down to work on the app.

I think at worst this is the part I’m just banging my head against the wall since I don’t want to lose my work in vain.